RangerPROJECT's New Home

Ranger has a place to call a permanent home. He is now in charge of kisses, licks, and tennis ball management. Although we had high hopes for Ranger, our expectations is not always the best for the dog. After an evaluation for a career of service to a local community, we realize Ranger might be better off giving kisses than trying to apprehend bad guys. Rather than start any type of advanced training, it was best decided to go the safe route and find him a good home.  Ranger now has a wonderful family dedicated to a life of Exercise, Obedience, and Affection. He has a huge yard to run around in until he passes out.

Ranger and his new family

Ranger and his new family

 Ranger will definitely be missed by not only myself but also Bandit. Ranger was relentless in his play with bandit and really showed bandit how to play once again. Bandit's ability to play was something that had been missing for quite some time, and Ranger taught him to trust a dog again. We will miss his eagerness to please and playful bows to other dogs. I will not miss you chewing of my boots and bassinet. 

Bandit and Ranger hanging out.  

Bandit and Ranger hanging out.  

A special thank you to Joe Nick for respect and trust you have in me and my abilities to train and care for your dogs! 

 

Ranger now has two brothers and a sister to play with on a daily basis. Ranger is getting spoiled by his family and getting his own house built just for him! This dog house will be insulated and equipped with air vents and carpet. Below are pictures sent in by Ranger's family showing the love he has. 

Ranger Brother

Ranger Brother

Ranger Sister

Ranger Sister

Ranger Sister giving kisses

Ranger Sister giving kisses

Ranger Brother belly rubs

Ranger Brother belly rubs

Ranger relaxing! 

Ranger relaxing! 

Helping dad built the new house! 

Helping dad built the new house! 

Checking the measurements and specs to ensure they are following township code.  

Checking the measurements and specs to ensure they are following township code.  

They approve of the new structure!  

They approve of the new structure!  

On behalf of Joe Nick, Myself, and the Mid-Atlantic K9 team; we wish Ranger the best and most fulfilling life. Remember Exercise, Obedience, and then Affection. 

 

-Sam Valenza,  Jr. 

KenjiPROJECT

Our newest client is a 10 week old miniature schnauzer. Kenji's owner has done the smartest thing hiring a dog trainer early on in the dogs life. Kenji is a very smart puppy and that has picked up on marker training very quickly!!! 

KenjiPROJECT hanging out on the front porch.  

KenjiPROJECT hanging out on the front porch.  

KenjiPROJECT already mastering the "DOWN"  

KenjiPROJECT already mastering the "DOWN"  

KenjiPROJECT working on the stand command. Or we use the term "Pop-Tall" 

KenjiPROJECT working on the stand command. Or we use the term "Pop-Tall" 

 

Please stay tuned to see more picture of KenjiPROJECT out socializing and doing environmental training sessions all throughout Philadelphia!

DashPROJECT K9 Nosework

Dash, a year old German Shepherd, has been working on his clove oil Scentwork for just over a month. Take a look at this 4 minute video of dash in a open field doing Scentwork. Watch his head turns which are indications he is picking up the the scent. 

K9 Nosework is the easiest and most fun exercise your dog can do. Your dogs nose is their strongest asset they have. Utilize it and have them work it. 10 minutes of Nosework is equivalent of running for almost 45 minutes. I encourage all dog owners to enroll in a Scentwork class with your dog. Builds companionship, bond, and earns trust with your dog.  

Call us at 267-685-MAK9 to start your class today!! 

RangerPROJECT's Environmental Training

When we took Ranger into our program, it was known that he had a fear of water. Not much scares him, but water and hoses were not his thing. A little over a week into our program and his is overcome the hose. This was accomplished by first taking his bowl outside, and placing it near the hose. Not ever turning the hose though, we used a water bottle and squirted the water into the bowl. This squirting mimics the intensity of water coming from a hose and into a bowl. And giving him a supply of water that way.

Next Step, while squirting the water in the bowl, and ranger loving it, we turned the hose on low and began filling the bowl up. Every time he stuck around and smelled the house and licked the water; we would mark and then reward his behavior.  And very quickly he associated the hose as a positive experience, thus making it more likely to occur again in the future. 

As for swimming, creeks, and shallow waters we used my personal dog Bandit, Ranger's favorite toy kong on a rope, and lots of praise.  So I found sometimes a dog learns best by watching another dog do something. So we went for a hike and Ranger watched the intensity of bandit swimming in the creeks and rivers of pennypack park. He gets to see how much fun Bandit is having and wanted to have what he has. The next step was playing tug with his kong along the riverbanks and gradually getting closer and closer to the water. Eventually when his drive and focus is so high that all he cared about is the kong, then we get him to run full speed at us and before he realizes it ranger and I are in the creek. It might last a second or two and he realizes where he is, and run back to shore. However lots of praise and high pitch enthusiastic emotion will let the dog know the immediately preceding the praise was awesome. 

Now just over a week or so into our environmental training and socialization Ranger has learned it is fun to play in water!! Be sure to water the YouTube video in HD

Ranger retrieving a stick from the Pennypack Creek.  

Ranger retrieving a stick from the Pennypack Creek.  

#RangerPROJECT

Ranger is a 14 month old German Shepherd. He is our newest project and possibly the next candidate for Police K9 Patrol School. He is still a pup, and yet has an incredible amount of ball drive. His temperament is one to rebound very quickly and overcome fears on the second try. Ranger will work for a ball,  a towel, a tug, and has learned to take his treats during marker training very easy from your hand. His obedience is coming along very nicely. We work mostly on environmental and socialization to ensure he is not afraid of any surfaces. 

Ranger hanging out with his #eliteK9 ball

Ranger hanging out with his #eliteK9 ball

Each day Ranger and I work to achieve a different skill or trick. Whether it be simple sit to rolling over. 

All obedience starts in a distraction free environment.  

All obedience starts in a distraction free environment.  

The head tilt will get them every time. It is impossible to not "aww"  when the dog gives the tilt of the head. 

The head tilt will get them every time. It is impossible to not "aww"  when the dog gives the tilt of the head. 

Stay with us as we continue to work and train with our newest project. A special thank you goes out to Joe Nick for the opportunity to evaluate, test, and train this pup in preparation of a wonderful career ahead of him.  

Trick Training Seminar

What a fabulous time we had at the Penn Vet Working Dog Center.   Look for future classes at CapableCanine.com. Dr. Cindy Otto is a great instructor. She has a solution for every problem or situation in which a dog may be hesitant to do comply with your verbal commands. She does a great job getting your dog to create the muscle memory before adding a command. Her knowledge, experience, and down to earth personality make her the ideal instructor for almost anyone. Novice to Experienced instructors can learn from her. This was my first time working with Dr. Otto and I strongly suggest any and all dog trainers to at least attend one of her seminars.  She addresses dogs training from an angle most owners never think about. 

Bandit learning to do the Chipmunk. This strengthens the core of a dog.  

Bandit learning to do the Chipmunk. This strengthens the core of a dog.  

Bandit learning the sit to stand. The blocks are used to keep his front paws in place and work the back legs to push up.  

Bandit learning the sit to stand. The blocks are used to keep his front paws in place and work the back legs to push up.  

Working on Bandits stability and strengthening his front legs.  

Working on Bandits stability and strengthening his front legs.  

What looks stupid to us can be a good test and challenge for our dogs. I learned something as simple as a box makes a dog use his back back legs. Most dogs don't realize or have their back leg awareness. They can't just walk into the box, they have to consciously lift their back legs one at a time into the box.  

What looks stupid to us can be a good test and challenge for our dogs. I learned something as simple as a box makes a dog use his back back legs. Most dogs don't realize or have their back leg awareness. They can't just walk into the box, they have to consciously lift their back legs one at a time into the box.  

June 21st is the official start of Summer

Read up more on the exact article at the below website!

http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2015/06/08/pet-overheating-symptoms.aspx?x_cid=20150608_lead_pet-overheating-symptoms_facebookpets

By Dr. Becker

Sunday, June 21st is the first day of summer this year, and after a particularly long cold winter in many parts of the US, I know we’re all looking forward to sunshine, warmer temperatures, and getting outdoors. As enjoyable as this time of year is though, it’s important to play it safe when it comes to fun in the sun for furry family members.

Our dogs have a higher body temp than we do, and less ability to cool down. Humans are covered with sweat glands, but a dog's are confined to her nose and the pads of her feet. 

An overheating dog can only regulate her body temperature through panting, which isn’t terribly efficient in hot weather. In a very short period of time, an overheated dog can suffer critical damage to her brain, heart, liver and nervous system.

Recognizing the Signs of Overheating in Your Pet

Heatstroke -- the ultimate and often deadly result of overheating -- is caused by a dangerous elevation in an animal's body temperature. While it most often occurs in dogs left in cars during the summer months, it can also happen in late spring and the first weeks of summer if a pet is exposed to high temperatures before he or she has acclimated to the heat.

Symptoms of overheating include:

Heavy panting or rapid breathing

Elevated body temperature

Excessive thirst

Weakness, collapse

Glazed eyes

Increased pulse and heartbeat

Vomiting, bloody diarrhea

Seizures

Bright or dark red tongue, gums

Excessive drooling

Staggering, stumbling

Unconsciousness

In addition to hot vehicles, other contributors to pet overheating include humid conditions, lack of drinking water, obesity, and overexertion.

Some pets are at higher risk for heat-related illness than others, including brachycephalic breeds (dogs and cats with flat faces and short noses), older pets, puppies and kittens, animals that are ill or have a chronic health condition, pets not used to warm weather, and any pet left outside in hot weather.

Tips for Keeping Your Pet Safe in the Heat

Leaving a pet unattended in a vehicle in extreme heat or cold is a criminal act in several states and municipalities. Most statutes have rescue provisions that allow certain individuals – for example police officers, firefighters, animal control officers, store employees -- to do whatever is necessary to rescue an animal trapped in a vehicle in extreme temperatures.

On summer days, it’s best to leave your pet home where she can stay cool, hydrated, and safe.

A good rule of thumb is if outdoor temps hit 90 degrees, your pet should be indoors where it's cool.

  1. Never, ever leave your pet alone in a parked car on a warm day. Not even for a minute. On a warm day, the temperature inside your vehicle can rise quickly into the danger zone. For example, on an 85-degree day it takes only 10 minutes for the temperature inside your parked car to climb to 102 degrees. In a half hour, it can hit 120 degrees. Leaving windows cracked doesn’t drop the temperature inside the vehicle. Leaving your car running with the air conditioner on is dangerous for a whole host of reasons.
  2. Don't walk or exercise your pet on hot pavement. This can be a tricky one to remember (unless you’re in the habit of walking your dog barefoot), but it’s extremely important. Not only can pavement on a hot day burn your dog’s paws, but the heat rising from concrete or asphalt can quickly overheat an animal that lives close to the ground. Also don't allow your pet to stand, walk or rest on hot outdoor surfaces like sidewalks or parking lots. 
  3. Exercise your dog during the coolest parts of the day. In most locations, this means early in the morning or after sunset. Try to stay in the shade during daylight hours, and no matter the time of day, don't overdo outdoor exercise or play sessions. Even on an overcast day or in the evening, a long period of physical exertion in hot weather can cause heatstroke in your dog.
  4. Provide plenty of fresh clean drinking water at all times. In addition to overheating, your pet can become dehydrated very rapidly in warm weather. A good general guideline is that a healthy dog should drink between ½ and 1 ounce of water per pound of body weight each day. And if she’ll be outside for any length of time, she should have access to complete shade. Periodically encourage her to play in the sprinkler or gently hose her down with cool water to prevent overheating.

Attention City Dwellers with Cats: Beware of Feline High Rise Syndrome

While overheating is less of a problem for cats than dogs (because kitties tend to find a nice cool napping spot on hot days), during the warmer months of the year more than a few city dwelling cats fall from open windows and fire escapes to the ground below. This is known as Feline High Rise Syndrome, and it can have devastating consequences.

Well-intentioned cat guardians who live in tall buildings often allow their kitties to sun themselves in open windows and on fire escapes. It sounds safe enough, however, the feline prey drive can lead a cat to try to pounce on moving birds or insects. Falls from tall buildings often result in shattered jaws, punctured lungs, broken limbs, and even death.

A few facts about High Rise Syndrome:

  • When a cat falls from a high perch it's unintentional, not deliberate. Cats are smart. They don't leap from high places because they know it's dangerous. 
  • The reason cats fall is usually because they are intensely focused on something outside, perhaps a bird, and either lose their balance or their prey instinct sends them out the window before they realize what they're doing. Another cause of falls is normal muscle twitching and other movement during deep sleep. A kitty can roll off a windowsill while changing sleep positions. 
  • While cats won't intentionally jump from a high perch, they also don't realize they can't dig their claws into brick, concrete, or steel surfaces to help prevent a fall if they lose their balance. 
  • When a cat falls from a high perch, he doesn't land squarely on all fours. He lands with his feet slightly apart, which is how serious head and pelvic injuries occur. And falling shorter distances can actually be more dangerous, because kitty doesn't have enough time to adjust his body to land correctly. 
  • Even if your cat survives a fall in relatively good condition, she'll land in an unfamiliar, frightening place on a sidewalk or street and can easily run away before you can get to her.